The Goddess Swap


bluemolda.jpg (9877 bytes) greenmolda.jpg (11710 bytes)
moonmolda.jpg (12122 bytes) wilmendorfmolda.jpg (10030 bytes)

 


The idea of the goddess swap was to pick a goddess - literally ANY kind of goddess and make Her in clay. These are my visions of The Goddess.

For this swap, I first developed four designs, scanned them into my computer, embedded them into an MSWord97 document and sized them to 3" tall. Printed them out and cut the outline of the goddesses into some scrap clay to create a mold.

For the molds, I used an X-Acto blade to roughly cut out the depressions for those areas I wanted raised. Then I used two pencil erasers gleaned from a 0.05 pencil, (real small and narrow erasers) to smooth and shape the depressions. It was tough to visualize just what I was trying to attempt!! The only way I could get it to finally click for me was to remember what body imprints used to look like when I laid in the sand on the beach!!! LOL

Once I finished shaping the molds, I baked them in my conventional oven at 250 degrees fahrenheidt (121 degrees celsius) for 35 minutes. After they cooled on the stovetop, I used an old make-up brush to liberally dust them with cornstarch.

I used Fimo transparent clay with glitter embedded in it for the first three goddesses with gold, silver and/or copper metallic powders brushed on the surface. The Moon Goddess I used Fimo black clay. After stamping the goddesses, I baked them in my conventional oven at 250 degrees fahrenheidt (121 degrees celsius) for 20 minutes. Next I embellished them with vines, leaves and metallic powders. For the Moon Goddess I painted the face with silver and gold metallic powder. All of the goddesses were finished with Future wax to seal the metallic powders to the surface and baked again, same temperature for an additional 15 minutes.

Click on the pictures above for a closer look at the molds and the pictures below for the finished goddess. Next to each goddess is the short blurp I added with them.


bluea.jpg (8215 bytes) This is one of my interpretations of The Earth Mother. She symbolizes abundance, health, life, death and renewal. I made a single stamp first and then impressed Her onto translucent sculpey filled with glitter. She is then surrounded by leaves symbolizing The Earth and its bounty made from glitter-filled translucent and green sculpey skinner blend using the TruLeigh Rose leaf cane tutorial at Polymer Clay Central.

greena.jpg (9138 bytes) This is one of my interpretations of The Earth Mother. This is my own design and is a double entendre. The arms and head is also a symbol for The God (symbolized by the horns) and The Goddess (symbolized by the moon between the horns). I made a single stamp first and then impressed Her onto translucent sculpey filled with glitter.

wilmendorfa.jpg (8587 bytes) This is one of my interpretations of The Earth Mother. I made a single stamp first loosely copying a picture of the "Wilmendorf Goddess" and then impressed Her onto translucent sculpey filled with glitter.

moona.jpg (8471 bytes) This is my interpretation of The Moon Goddess. To me she symbolizes feminine power, a more gentle reflection of The Sun God's fierce power, the never-ending circle of birth, life, death and renewal, and for all things a season. This is my own design and is a double entendre. The person "drawing down the moon" is also a symbol for The God (symbolized by the horns) and The Goddess (symbolized by the moon between the horns). I made a single stamp first and then impressed Her onto black Fimo. When She was baked, I painted the silver and gold with metallic powder and finished Her with Future.

To see the goddesses I received, CLICK HERE!


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Online Jigsaw Puzzles of my polymer clay projects or
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Different desktop backgrounds.
Different craft offerings for your enjoyment. My way of saying thank you!

1) Coathanger Christmas Tree
2) Coathanger Wreath
3) Origami Giftbox
4) Tiny Hinges


Copyright 2004-2013 Colleen D. Bergeron.
Last revised: February 20 2013