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Basic tools for recycled paper:

1. Junk mail, paper bags, newspapers, magazines, whatever....
2. Scissors
3. Blender
4. Water source
5. Vat (Rubbermaid™ container, storage bin, etc. - please do not use your sink. Pulp will plug up a plumbing system royally.)
6. Mould and deckle (A nice explanation for that is HERE.)
7. A "post." (Towels and a pillow case on top of the stack)
8. "Felts." (Sheets, pillow cases, actual felt, Pellon, old wool blankets, kitchen towels, flannel, Handi-wipes® , etc.)
9. Sponge
10. A board big enough to spread all your paper on for drying or an iron with an ironing surface
11. If the board or iron is not used, clothespins and clothesline or hangers

Basic tools for paper from plant pulp:

1. Plants already converted into pulp (you can buy beaten plants from Twinrocker Handmade Paper, The Carriage House in the United States and The Paperwright in Canada).
2. Scissors
3. Blender
4. Water source
5. Vat (Rubbermaid™ container, storage bin, etc. - please do not use your sink. Pulp will plug up a plumbing system royally.)
6. Mould and deckle (A nice explanation for that is HERE.)
7. A "post." (Towels and a pillow case on top of the stack)
8. "Felts." (Sheets, pillow cases, actual felt, Pellon, old wool blankets, kitchen towels, flannel, Handi-wipes® , etc.)
9. Sponge
10. A board to stick the paper on for drying or an iron with an ironing surface
11. If the board is not used, clothespins and clothesline or hangers

Basic tools for paper from plants still in the ground. Not everything listed is necessary, there are variations and alternatives on several lines:

1. Identification guide, location of plants, permission from the owner if it's on private property (Please be thorough with your research to determine if your harvest is abundant, a weed or a noxious plant. Know how to tell the difference between poisonous and non-poisonous plants that look alike, learn the natives in your area and find out whether or not the plant you reach for is endangered or on the watch list. Harvesting 25% of a plant or stand will insure continued survivability.)
2. Pitchfork, shovel, trowel, garden claw
3. Garden gloves and/or leather gloves, long-sleeve shirt, long pants, closed footwear (tennies, work boots, etc.)
4. Yard bags, rope/twine and/or tarps for transport
5. Chipper/shredder (optional but really helpful), scissors, garden snips, loppers, hand axe
6. Large stainless steel or enamel pot (aluminum pots react with the chemicals used during cooking and spoil the plants)
7. Water source
8. Outdoor or well ventilated area for cooking and cooking surface
9. Stainless steel or wooden spoon or wooden stir stick (I've been known to use a small branch)
10. Lye or Arm & Hammer Washing SODA
11. Kitchen gloves
12. Bag for rinsing (pillow case, netting, paint strainer, curtain sheers, etc.)
13. Blender, beater, or wooden mallets
14. Vat (Rubbermaid™ container, storage bin, etc. - please do not use your sink. Pulp will plug up a plumbing system royally.)
15. Mould and deckle, screening, box with holes, coffee cans or linen
16. A "post." (Towels and a pillow case on top of the stack)
17. "Felts." (Sheets, pillow cases, actual felt, Pellon interfacing, kitchen towels, flannel, landscape fabric, Handi-wipes® , etc.)
18. Sponge
19. Hydraulic press, a car or someone who is nice and heavy
20. Paper dryer, drying board, clothespins and clothesline or hangers

 

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Thank you for your stopping by! Please enjoy these free tutorials. You may print them, use them as your own teaching aid and/or share them as you please. You may not sell them.

 

1) Coathanger Christmas Tree
2) Coathanger Wreath
3) Origami Giftbox
4) Tiny Hinges

5) How to blow an egg
6) How To Modify Your Jewelry Pliers

 

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